Tag Archives: Buddhism

Mindful Quote(s) of the Day 07APR 2014 – Suffering

Thich Nhat Hanh
Thich Nhat Hanh (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar.”

“When another person makes you suffer, it is because he suffers deeply within himself, and his suffering is spilling over. He does not need punishment; he needs help. That’s the message he is sending.” 
? Thích Nh?t H?nh

Mindfulness of Life – Poetry of the Day 25MAR 2014

Clinical research shows Buddhist mindfulness t...
Clinical research shows Buddhist mindfulness techniques can help alleviate anxiety , stress , and depression (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When we understand that life is short and
Time is precious and if we will have developed
Some understanding of the Dharmma and life wisdom,
It becomes more precious.

Do not procrastinate,
Do what should be done today,
We don’t know whether we will be still alive tomorrow.

Today, now, do what should be done,
Try to accomplish your dreams, to do what you want to do.
Be mindful where am I going, What is my life goal?

Let go of the things of past, and
Be willing to fully live in the present;
Be willing to change and grow.

Often we are afraid and fail to change, to grow,
And because of lack of confidence and self trust.
We don’t try our best and not determine enough.

We are responsible for ourselves and our life,
No matter what happened in the past and now,
Without blaming anyone.

It is a natural thing for every being to experience
Good and bad things in life,
reflecting on this it helps to let go to not get attached.

Happiness Quote of the Day 21 March 2014 – Mental Habits

Thich Nhat Hanh
Cover of Thich Nhat Hanh

We have negative mental habits that come up over and over again. One of the most significant negative habits we should be aware of is that of constantly allowing our mind to run off into the future. Perhaps we got this from our parents. Carried away by our worries, we’re unable to live fully and happily in the present. Deep down, we believe we can’t really be happy just yet—that we still have a few more boxes to be checked off before we can really enjoy life. We speculate, dream, strategize, and plan for these “conditions of happiness” we want to have in the future; and we continually chase after that future, even while we sleep. We may have fears about the future because we don’t know how it’s going to turn out, and these worries and anxieties keep us from enjoying being here now.

Thich Nhat Hanh

Thich Nhat Hanh Feelings come and go likes clo...
Thich Nhat Hanh Feelings come and go likes clouds in a windy sky. Conscious breathing is my anchor (Photo credit: symphony of love)

Quote of the Day 20 January 2014 – empirical evidence

English: 14th Dalai Lama, Dharasmala, India
English: 14th Dalai Lama, Dharasmala, India (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“On the philosophical level, both Buddhism and modern science share a deep suspicion of any notion of absolutes, whether conceptualize as a transcendent being, as an eternal, unchanging principle such as soul, or as a fundamental substratum of reality. … In the Buddhist investigation of reality, at least in principle, empirical evidence should triumph over scriptural authority, no matter how deeply venerated a scripture may be. ~ 14th Dalai Lama in his talk to the Society for Neuroscience in 2005 in Washington.”
Dalai Lama XIV

Quote of the Day 10 January 2014 – Leakage

Head-shot of Eckhart Tolle from a slight angle...
Head-shot of Eckhart Tolle from a slight angle by Kyle Hoobin. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Your mind is an instrument, a tool. It is there to be used for a specific task, and when the task is completed, you lay it down. As it is, I would say about 80 to 90 percent of most people’s thinking is not only repetitive and useless, but because of its dysfunctional and often negative nature, much of it is also harmful. Observe your mind and you will find this to be true. It causes a serious leakage of vital energy. Eckhart Tolle

Thoughts of the Day 13 October 2013 – Human Satisfaction

Tenzin Gyatso, the fourteenth and current Dala...
Tenzin Gyatso, the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama, is the leader of the exiled Tibetan government in India. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1989. Photographed during his visit in Cologno Monzese MI, Italy, on december 8th, 2007. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When I meet people in different parts of the world, I am always reminded that we are all basically alike: we are all human beings. Maybe we have different clothes, our skin is of a different colour, or we speak different languages. That is on the surface. But basically, we are the same human beings.

Human beings by nature want happiness and do not want suffering. With that
feeling everyone tries to achieve happiness and tries to get rid of suffering, and everyone has the basic right to do this. In this way, all here are the same, whether rich or poor, educated or uneducated, Easterner or Westerner, believer or non-believer, and within believers whether Buddhist, Christian, Jewish, Muslim, and so on. Basically, from the viewpoint of real human value we are all the same.

Human happiness and human satisfaction must ultimately come from within oneself. It is wrong to expect some final satisfaction to come from money or from a computer.

How can we eliminate the deepest source of all unsatisfactory experience? Only by cultivating certain qualities within our mindstream. Unless we possess high spiritual qualifications, there is no doubt that the events life throws upon us will give rise to frustration, emotional turmoil, and other distorted states of consciousness. These imperfect states of mind in turn give rise to imperfect activities, and the seeds of suffering are ever planted in a steady flow. On the other hand, when the mind can dwell in the wisdom that knows the ultimate mode of being, one is able to destroy the deepest root of distortion, negative karma and sorrow.”

~Dalai Lama

Quote of the Day 07 October 2013 – Learning How to Give

Helping others entails learning how you are helped. In order to heal others, you must learn to heal yourself. Learning how to give to yourself is part of learning how to give to others. If you are stingy with yourself, you will be stingy with others. When you understand how everything is given to you, you will be able to give everything to others.
~ Reb Anderson

Tenshin Reb Anderson - Learning How to Give

Who is Reb Anderson:
<from his own bio>
Reb Anderson, Tenshin Roshi is a lineage-holder in the Soto Zen tradition. Born in Mississipi, he grew up in Minnesota and left advanced study in mathematics and Western psychology to come to Zen Center in 1967. He practiced with Suzuki Roshi, who ordained him as a priest in 1970 and gave him the name Tenshin Zenki (“Naturally Real, The Whole Works”). He received dharma transmission in 1983 and served as abbot of San Francisco Zen Center‘s three training centers (City Center, Green Gulch Farm and Tassajara Zen Mountain Center) from 1986 to 1995. Tenshin Roshi continues to teach at Zen Center, living with his family at Green Gulch Farm. He is author of “Warm Smiles from Cold Mountains: Dharma Talks on Zen Meditation” and “Being Upright: Zen Meditation and the Bodhisattva Precepts“.

Quote of the Day 28 Sept 2013 ~ Cultivation of Mindfulness

The Quote of the day... Cultivation of Mindfulness

WHEN we let go of wanting something else to happen in this moment, we are taking a profound step toward being able to encounter what is here now. If we hope to go anywhere or develop ourselves in any way, we can only step from where we are standing. If we don’t really know where we are standing—a knowing that comes directly from the cultivation of mindfulness—we may only go in circles, for all our efforts and expectations. So, in meditation practice, the best way to get somewhere is to let go of trying to get anywhere at all.

Speaking of The Cultivation of Minfulness. Jon Kabat-Zinn, Stu Crabb, Michelle Gale

Defining “Cultivation of Mindfulness”
cultivation
nouncultivation; plural nouncultivations
  1. 1.
    the action of cultivating land, or the state of being cultivated.
     “the cultivation of crops”
  2. 2.
    the process of trying to acquire or develop a quality or skill.
     “the cultivation of good staff–management relations”
  3. 3.
    refinement and good education.
     “a man of cultivation and taste”
mindfulness
noun
  1. 1.
    the quality or state of being conscious or aware of something.
     “their mindfulness of the wider cinematic tradition”
  2. 2.
    a mental state achieved by focusing one’s awareness on the present moment, while calmly acknowledging and accepting one’s feelings, thoughts, and bodily sensations, used as a therapeutic technique.

Quote of the Day 22 September 2013 – “Inner Peace”

 

Based on :Image:Peace Sign.svg, drawn with thi...
Based on :Image:Peace Sign.svg, drawn with thicker lines. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

No one can find inner peace except by working, not in a self- centered way, but for the whole human family.

 

~Buddha

 

Quote of the Day 15 September 2013

English: A logo for the Quote of the Day on Si...
English: A logo for the Quote of the Day on Simple English Wikiquote (but may be used elsewhere). (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mindfulness means moment-to-moment, non-judgmental awareness. It is cultivated by refining our capacity to pay attention, intentionally, in the present moment, and then sustaining that attention over time as best we can. In the process, we become more in touch with our life as it is unfolding.