Carl Jung Quote for 16APR 2014 ~ Catastrophes

Carl-Jung-mod

Carl-Jung-mod (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“The gigantic catastrophes that threaten us today are not elemental happenings of a physical or biological order, but psychic events. To a quite terrifying degree we are threatened by wars and revolutions which are nothing other than psychic epidemics. At any moment several million human beings may be smitten with a new madness, and then we shall have another world war or devastating revolution. Instead of being at the mercy of wild beasts, earthquakes, landslides, and inundations, modern man is battered by the elemental forces of his own psyche.”

Signature of Carl Jung

Signature of Carl Jung (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Attributed to Carl Jung

Mindfulness of Life – Poetry of the Day 25MAR 2014

Clinical research shows Buddhist mindfulness t...

Clinical research shows Buddhist mindfulness techniques can help alleviate anxiety , stress , and depression (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When we understand that life is short and
Time is precious and if we will have developed
Some understanding of the Dharmma and life wisdom,
It becomes more precious.

Do not procrastinate,
Do what should be done today,
We don’t know whether we will be still alive tomorrow.

Today, now, do what should be done,
Try to accomplish your dreams, to do what you want to do.
Be mindful where am I going, What is my life goal?

Let go of the things of past, and
Be willing to fully live in the present;
Be willing to change and grow.

Often we are afraid and fail to change, to grow,
And because of lack of confidence and self trust.
We don’t try our best and not determine enough.

We are responsible for ourselves and our life,
No matter what happened in the past and now,
Without blaming anyone.

It is a natural thing for every being to experience
Good and bad things in life,
reflecting on this it helps to let go to not get attached.

Freudian Words of the Day 22Feb 2014 ~ Oedipus Complex

Oedipus complex: Oedipus explains the riddle o...

Oedipus complex: Oedipus explains the riddle of the Sphinx, Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres. (ca. 1805) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Religion is the universal obsessional neurosis of mankind; like the obsessional neurosis of children, arouse out of the Oedipus complex, out of the relation to the father… [It is] a parallel to the neurosis which the civilized individual must pass through on his way from childhood to maturity.”

“The GodCreator is openly called father. Psychoanalysis concludes that he really is the father, clothed in the grandeur in which he once appeared to the small child… The emotional strength of this memory-image and the lasting nayure of his need for protection are the two supports for [the religious man’s] belief in God.”

“Devout believers are safeguarded in a high degree against the risk of certain neurotic illnesses; their acceptance of the universal neurosis spares them the task of constructing the personal one.”

“Think of the depressing contrast between the radiant intelligence of a healthy child and the feeble intellectual powers of the average adult. Can we be certain that it is not precisely religious education which bears a large share of the blame for this relative atrophy?”

Portrait of Sigmund Freud

Portrait of Sigmund Freud (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Like other neurosis or addictions, religion can be overcome, but only by facing up to the truth:”They will have to [Step One] admit to themselves the full extent of their helplessness and their insignificance in the machinery of the universe; they can no longer be the centre of creation, no longer the object of tender care on the part of a beneficent Providence… ‘education to reality.’… It is something, at any rate, to know that one is thrown upon one’s resources. One learns then to make a proper use of them.

Sigmund Freud (1856-1939)

English: Sigmund Freud's signature.

English: Sigmund Freud’s signature. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Quote of the Day 16 January 2014 – World

A wall-mounted quote by Charles Augustus Lindb...

A wall-mounted quote by Charles Augustus Lindbergh in The American Adventure in the World Showcase pavilion of Walt Disney World’s Epcot (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“I don’t think the world is the way we like to think it is. I don’t think it’s one solid world, but many, thousands upon thousands of them–as many as there are people–because each person perceives the world in his or her own way; each lives in his or her own world. Sometimes they connect, for a moment, or more rarely, for a lifetime, but mostly we are alone, each living in our own world, suffering our small deaths.”
? Charles de LintDreams Underfoot

Quote of the Day 13 January 2014 – Relationships

Cover of "The Happiness Hypothesis: Findi...

Cover via Amazon

“Happiness is not something that you can find, acquire, or achieve directly. You have to get the conditions right and then wait. Some of those conditions are within you, such as coherence among the parts and levels of your personality. Other conditions require relationships to things beyond you: Just as plants need sun, water, and good soil to thrive, people need love, work, and a connection to something larger. It is worth striving to get the right relationships between yourself and others, between yourself and your work, and between yourself and something larger thank yourself. If you get these relationships right, a sense of purpose and meaning will emerge.”
Jonathan Haidt, The Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom

Quote of the Day 3 January 2013 – Commitment

Prioritize

Prioritize (Photo credit: Celestine Chua)

I’m convinced that we can write and live our own scripts more than most people will acknowledge. I also know the price that must be paid. It’s a real struggle to do it. It requires visualization and affirmation. It involves living a life of integrity, starting with making and keeping promises, until the whole human personality the senses, the thinking, the feeling, and the intuition are ultimately integrated and harmonized.
Stephen Covey

Quote of the Day 21 December 2013 – Relationships

Cover of "The Happiness Hypothesis: Findi...

Cover via Amazon

“Happiness is not something that you can find, acquire, or achieve directly. You have to get the conditions right and then wait. Some of those conditions are within you, such as coherence among the parts and levels of your personality. Other conditions require relationships to things beyond you: Just as plants need sun, water, and good soil to thrive, people need love, work, and a connection to something larger. It is worth striving to get the right relationships between yourself and others, between yourself and your work, and between yourself and something larger thank yourself. If you get these relationships right, a sense of purpose and meaning will emerge.”
Jonathan HaidtThe Happiness Hypothesis: Finding Modern Truth in Ancient Wisdom

 

Quote of the Day 12 October 2013 ~ Going to Sleep

Cover of "The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and ... Going to Sleep

 

Going to sleep is a little like dying. We completely lose ourselves in a void for some period of time, until we arise again in a dream. When we do so, we may have a different identity and a different body. We may be in a strange place, with people we do not know, involved in baffling activities that may seem quite risky.
[…]
Most importantly, in dream the mind‘s limitations can be challenged and overcome. As they are, we develop flexibility of mind, and this is most important. Why is flexibility of mind so important? Because the rigidities of mind, the limitations of wrong views that obscure wisdom and constrict experience, keep us ensnared in illusory identities and prevent us from finding freedom.

(The Tibetan Yogas of Dream and Sleep)

Tenzin Wangyal Rinpoche, a lama in the Bön tradition of Tibet, presently resides in Charlottesville, Virginia. He is the founder and director of Ligmincha Institute, an organization dedicated to the study and practice of the teachings of the Bön tradition. He was born in Amritsar, India, after his parents fled the Chinese invasion of Tibet and received training from both Buddhist and Bön teachers, attaining the degree of Geshe, the highest academic degree of traditional Tibetan culture. He has been in the United States since 1991 and has taught widely in Europe and America.

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Quote of the Day 16 September 2013

“Do not dwell in the past, do not dream of the future, concentrate the mind on the present moment.” ~Buddha

Statue of Buddha in Vietnam

Statue of Buddha in Vietnam (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The quote of the day generally comes to you without commentary… Not today. The quote doesn’t begin to describe the night I just had. I HAD DREAMS LAST NIGHT!!! We all dream, whether we remember them or not. I never have “JUST” dreams.

My dream history is flooded by terror. Running from… running to… panic. PTSD dreams… Waking up out of breath… sweating… fear… anger. I never get to where I don’t know where I’m getting to. NOT THIS NIGHT! I don’t remember the last time I had a dream(s) remembering more than the last five to ten seconds as I come out of the fog of that which keeps the night terror away. Mood enhancer and sleeper before bed… yes medicated sleep. Another difference last night…

I didn’t get more than two hours of sleep at a time, but it was all more than blissful. Maybe that was the sweet spot. I was with… err… surrounded by my small circle of friends and family and it was outside of my cave… surrounded by love.

Could blood thinned by rat poison (coumadin) be seeping out of the firewall that surrounds my cave? I don’t care the reason. Quite possibly the best night of sleep in decades.

Never mind we were dropping dingle-berries together, but that was significant. I saw faces… faces of the people I love. And it was all happy!

It’s good to be alive! It’s great to be alive!