Mindful Quote(s) of the Day 07APR 2014 – Suffering

Thich Nhat Hanh

Thich Nhat Hanh (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“People have a hard time letting go of their suffering. Out of a fear of the unknown, they prefer suffering that is familiar.”

“When another person makes you suffer, it is because he suffers deeply within himself, and his suffering is spilling over. He does not need punishment; he needs help. That’s the message he is sending.” 
? Thích Nh?t H?nh

Happiness Quote of the Day 21 March 2014 – Mental Habits

Thich Nhat Hanh

Cover of Thich Nhat Hanh

We have negative mental habits that come up over and over again. One of the most significant negative habits we should be aware of is that of constantly allowing our mind to run off into the future. Perhaps we got this from our parents. Carried away by our worries, we’re unable to live fully and happily in the present. Deep down, we believe we can’t really be happy just yet—that we still have a few more boxes to be checked off before we can really enjoy life. We speculate, dream, strategize, and plan for these “conditions of happiness” we want to have in the future; and we continually chase after that future, even while we sleep. We may have fears about the future because we don’t know how it’s going to turn out, and these worries and anxieties keep us from enjoying being here now.

Thich Nhat Hanh

Thich Nhat Hanh Feelings come and go likes clo...

Thich Nhat Hanh Feelings come and go likes clouds in a windy sky. Conscious breathing is my anchor (Photo credit: symphony of love)

Quote of the Day 07 October 2013 – Learning How to Give

Helping others entails learning how you are helped. In order to heal others, you must learn to heal yourself. Learning how to give to yourself is part of learning how to give to others. If you are stingy with yourself, you will be stingy with others. When you understand how everything is given to you, you will be able to give everything to others.
~ Reb Anderson

Tenshin Reb Anderson - Learning How to Give

Who is Reb Anderson:
<from his own bio>
Reb Anderson, Tenshin Roshi is a lineage-holder in the Soto Zen tradition. Born in Mississipi, he grew up in Minnesota and left advanced study in mathematics and Western psychology to come to Zen Center in 1967. He practiced with Suzuki Roshi, who ordained him as a priest in 1970 and gave him the name Tenshin Zenki (“Naturally Real, The Whole Works”). He received dharma transmission in 1983 and served as abbot of San Francisco Zen Center‘s three training centers (City Center, Green Gulch Farm and Tassajara Zen Mountain Center) from 1986 to 1995. Tenshin Roshi continues to teach at Zen Center, living with his family at Green Gulch Farm. He is author of “Warm Smiles from Cold Mountains: Dharma Talks on Zen Meditation” and “Being Upright: Zen Meditation and the Bodhisattva Precepts“.